Cicero, Pro Roscio Amerino 146

 

146

Facis iniuriam, Chrysogone, si maiorem spem emptionis tuae in huius exitio ponis quam in iis rebus, quas L. Sulla gessit. Quodsi tibi causa nulla est, cur hunc miserum tanta calamitate adfici velis, si tibi omnia sua praeter animam tradidit nec sibi quicquam paternum ne monumenti quidem causa clam reservavit, per deos immortales, quae ista tanta crudelitas est, quae tam fera immanisque natura? Quis umquam praedo fuit tam nefarius, quis pirata tam barbarus, ut, cum integram praedam sine sanguine habere posset, cruenta spolia detrahere mallet?

146

You do wrong, Chrysogonus, if you place greater hope of being able to preserve your purchase, than in those exploits which Lucius Sulla has performed. But if you have no cause for wishing this unhappy man to be afflicted with such a grievous calamity; if he has given up to you everything but his life, and has reserved to himself nothing of his paternal property, not even as a memorial of his father,--then, in the name of the gods, what is the meaning of this cruelty, of this savage and inhuman disposition? What bandit was ever so wicked, what pirate was ever so barbarous, as to prefer stripping off his spoils from his victim stained with his blood, when he might possess his plunder unstained, without blood? 

 

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